Tinnitus, proteins & Rosetta@Home

Message boards : Rosetta@home Science : Tinnitus, proteins & Rosetta@Home

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Otto

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Message 60835 - Posted: 26 Apr 2009, 20:49:46 UTC

Hi,

As one suffering from noise-induced tinnitus, I was wondering if Rosetta@home was going to fold proteins in the human (or mammalian) inner ear?

"Scientists widely recognize that tinnitus results from miscommunication between cells in the auditory system. We hypothesize that this incorrect communication reflects an abnormal gene expression. This means that perhaps the auditory cells of tinnitus sufferers produce too many or too few of the proteins important in auditory communication. This ATA grant enables us to do further analyses on expression of 18 genes involved in communication and function of the auditory system. We will perform these experiments on normal-hearing rats and rats with aspirin-induced tinnitus. We trust that the outcome of our work will uncover new therapeutic targets for tinnitus treatment."

http://www.ata.org/research/newly-funded

Is the problem with tinnitus & proteins more qualitative or quantitative? Anyhow, here's to hoping we'd fold proteins related to hearing & sound perception, too.
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Profile robertmiles

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Message 60996 - Posted: 4 May 2009, 16:57:14 UTC - in response to Message 60835.  

Hi,

As one suffering from noise-induced tinnitus, I was wondering if Rosetta@home was going to fold proteins in the human (or mammalian) inner ear?

"Scientists widely recognize that tinnitus results from miscommunication between cells in the auditory system. We hypothesize that this incorrect communication reflects an abnormal gene expression. This means that perhaps the auditory cells of tinnitus sufferers produce too many or too few of the proteins important in auditory communication. This ATA grant enables us to do further analyses on expression of 18 genes involved in communication and function of the auditory system. We will perform these experiments on normal-hearing rats and rats with aspirin-induced tinnitus. We trust that the outcome of our work will uncover new therapeutic targets for tinnitus treatment."

http://www.ata.org/research/newly-funded

Is the problem with tinnitus & proteins more qualitative or quantitative? Anyhow, here's to hoping we'd fold proteins related to hearing & sound perception, too.


My guess is that as soon as a researcher identifies some of those proteins and asks for more informations on their structure, they'll be willing to start folding them.

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Otto

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Message 61005 - Posted: 4 May 2009, 20:01:27 UTC

Thanks for the answer!
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Profile Big_Bang

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Message 74183 - Posted: 5 Nov 2012, 20:03:55 UTC

As a recent sufferer of Tinnitus myself, I am wondering if Rosetta@Home could help us treat this phantom sound in any way.

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Message boards : Rosetta@home Science : Tinnitus, proteins & Rosetta@Home



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