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SekeRob

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Message 28857 - Posted: 3 Oct 2006, 10:50:41 UTC - in response to Message 28856.  

well ketch-up is an Italian invention and is one of the base ingredients on a properly prepared pizza together with mozzarella.

what some cooks has to say about catsup or ketjap, the merriam-webster definition is:

ketchup
One entry found for ketchup.
Main Entry: ketch·up
Variant(s): also catch·up /'ke-ch&p, 'ka- /; or cat·sup /'ke-ch&p, 'ka-; 'kat-s&p/
Function: noun
Etymology: Malay kechap fish sauce
: a seasoned pureed condiment usually made from tomatoes


condiment in the average joe speech is the pepper and salt, but again per merriam webster:

condiment
One entry found for condiment.
Main Entry: con·di·ment
Pronunciation: 'kän-d&-m&nt
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Latin condimentum, from condire to season
: something used to enhance the flavor of food; especially : a pungent seasoning
- con·di·men·tal /"kän-d&-'men-t&l/ adjective


On-Topic.....Baker/Kim have said the subject is closed and right they are.
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Message 28858 - Posted: 3 Oct 2006, 12:01:56 UTC - in response to Message 28856.  

This thread has become as productive as trying to agree if it is Ketchup or Catsup the name of the condiment you place over Hot Dogs.

Ketjap (sounds alike, but is dutch for soya souce)
In german and dutch it's Ketchup, btw.



See another example of miscommunication that can lead to flames: I did not ask for the German or Dutch word? I wrote a plain question in English so, the answer has to be referenceable to the language I wrote in.

And I hope that by know people are starting to realize my point: if a simple question about a simple condiment written in plain English can be misread, misinterpreted so people go all over the board answering what was not asked about; Guess what happens when the comments and or questions posited ar about a charged issue like credits.

Thanks be to G-d there is no relationship between Catsup or Ketchup ( which are both valid names for the same condiment in English) and credits. Had it been , there would have been a major flame war by now. :)


Actually you did not ask a question at all. So people are just giving an opinion on your statement.


P.S. Actually in English (true english, it is Ketchup or Red Sauce. Yours is just a regional language of American English ;-))





So now an answer has to be given to the PS...of course in Red



A little article for your edification and instruction...

KETCHUP VERSUS CATSUP
[Q] From Suzanne: “Why is ketchup also called catsup?”

[A] Ketchup was one of the earliest names given to this condiment, so spelled in Charles Lockyer’s book of 1711, An Account of the Trade in India: “Soy comes in Tubbs from Jappan, and the best Ketchup from Tonquin; yet good of both sorts are made and sold very cheap in China”. Nobody seems quite sure where it comes from, and I won’t bore you with a long disquisition concerning the scholarly debate on the matter, which is reflected in the varied origins given in major dictionaries. It’s likely to be from a Chinese dialect, imported into English through Malay. The original was a kind of fish sauce, though the modern Malay and Indonesian version, with the closely related name kecap, is a sweet soy sauce.

Like their Eastern forerunners, Western ketchups were dipping sauces. I’m told the first ketchup recipe appeared in Elizabeth Smith’s book The Compleat Housewife of 1727 and that it included anchovies, shallots, vinegar, white wine, sweet spices (cloves, ginger, mace, nutmeg), pepper and lemon peel. Not a tomato in sight, you will note—tomato ketchup was not introduced until about a century later, in the US, and caught on only slowly. It was more usual to base the condiment on mushrooms, or sometimes walnuts.

The confusion about names started even before Charles Lockyer wrote about it, since there is an entry dated 1690 in the Dictionary of the Canting Crew which gives it as catchup, which is another Anglicisation of the original Eastern term. Catchup was used much more in North America than in Britain: it was still common in the middle years of the nineteenth century, as in a story in Scribner’s Magazine in 1859: “I do not object to take a few slices of cold boiled ham ... with a little mushroom catchup, some Worcester sauce, and a pickle or so”. Indeed, catchup continued to appear in American works for some decades and is still to be found on occasion.

There were lots of other spellings, too, of which catsup is the best known, a modification of catchup. You can blame Jonathan Swift for it if you like, since he used it first in 1730: “And, for our home-bred British cheer, Botargo, catsup, and caveer”. [Caveer is caviar; botargo is a fish-based relish made of the roe of the mullet or tunny.] That form was also once common in the US but is much less so these days, at least on bottle labels: all the big US manufacturers now call their product ketchup.


And the a nasty comment would follow: something like the question was implied...cant you think?

We get a moderator in...and voila!!! We have us a flame war!!!!!!

:) :) :)


Seems that is on about the US-Americans again and the US-Americans use of Ketchup/catsup. US-Americans don't use true English ;-)



-------

[quote]On-Topic.....Baker/Kim have said the subject is closed and right they are.[/url]


What's that got to do with stinky feet ?


:)


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Message 28860 - Posted: 3 Oct 2006, 14:12:45 UTC - in response to Message 28857.  

Sekerob [caution: "cheeky" comments ahead]
On-Topic.....Baker/Kim have said the subject is closed and right they are.


This is a senseless, and unsubstantiated claim. Either post direct references or don't post at all! What is the point of asserting such a thing and not backing it up with hard facts? And what do you care? Your RAC is low anyway.

[I just wanted to practice the new style of "board-speak". I hope you find it amuseing]
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Message 28861 - Posted: 3 Oct 2006, 14:39:16 UTC - in response to Message 28858.  

[quote]This thread has become as productive as trying to agree if it is Ketchup or Catsup the name of the condiment you place over Hot Dogs.

Ketjap (sounds alike, but is dutch for soya souce)
In german and dutch it's Ketchup, btw.



See another example of miscommunication that can lead to flames: I did not ask for the German or Dutch word? I wrote a plain question in English so, the answer has to be referenceable to the language I wrote in.

And I hope that by know people are starting to realize my point: if a simple question about a simple condiment written in plain English can be misread, misinterpreted so people go all over the board answering what was not asked about; Guess what happens when the comments and or questions posited ar about a charged issue like credits.

Thanks be to G-d there is no relationship between Catsup or Ketchup ( which are both valid names for the same condiment in English) and credits. Had it been , there would have been a major flame war by now. :)


Actually you did not ask a question at all. So people are just giving an opinion on your statement.


P.S. Actually in English (true english, it is Ketchup or Red Sauce. Yours is just a regional language of American English ;-))





So now an answer has to be given to the PS...of course in Red



A little article for your edification and instruction...

KETCHUP VERSUS CATSUP
[Q] From Suzanne: “Why is ketchup also called catsup?”

[A] Ketchup was one of the earliest names given to this condiment, so spelled in Charles Lockyer’s book of 1711, An Account of the Trade in India: “Soy comes in Tubbs from Jappan, and the best Ketchup from Tonquin; yet good of both sorts are made and sold very cheap in China”. Nobody seems quite sure where it comes from, and I won’t bore you with a long disquisition concerning the scholarly debate on the matter, which is reflected in the varied origins given in major dictionaries. It’s likely to be from a Chinese dialect, imported into English through Malay. The original was a kind of fish sauce, though the modern Malay and Indonesian version, with the closely related name kecap, is a sweet soy sauce.

Like their Eastern forerunners, Western ketchups were dipping sauces. I’m told the first ketchup recipe appeared in Elizabeth Smith’s book The Compleat Housewife of 1727 and that it included anchovies, shallots, vinegar, white wine, sweet spices (cloves, ginger, mace, nutmeg), pepper and lemon peel. Not a tomato in sight, you will note—tomato ketchup was not introduced until about a century later, in the US, and caught on only slowly. It was more usual to base the condiment on mushrooms, or sometimes walnuts.

The confusion about names started even before Charles Lockyer wrote about it, since there is an entry dated 1690 in the Dictionary of the Canting Crew which gives it as catchup, which is another Anglicisation of the original Eastern term. Catchup was used much more in North America than in Britain: it was still common in the middle years of the nineteenth century, as in a story in Scribner’s Magazine in 1859: “I do not object to take a few slices of cold boiled ham ... with a little mushroom catchup, some Worcester sauce, and a pickle or so”. Indeed, catchup continued to appear in American works for some decades and is still to be found on occasion.

There were lots of other spellings, too, of which catsup is the best known, a modification of catchup. You can blame Jonathan Swift for it if you like, since he used it first in 1730: “And, for our home-bred British cheer, Botargo, catsup, and caveer”. [Caveer is caviar; botargo is a fish-based relish made of the roe of the mullet or tunny.] That form was also once common in the US but is much less so these days, at least on bottle labels: all the big US manufacturers now call their product ketchup.


And the a nasty comment would follow: something like the question was implied...cant you think?

We get a moderator in...and voila!!! We have us a flame war!!!!!!

:) :) :)


Seems that is on about the US-Americans again and the US-Americans use of Ketchup/catsup. US-Americans don't use true English ;-)



-------

On-Topic.....Baker/Kim have said the subject is closed and right they are.[/url]


What's that got to do with stinky feet ?


:)





Well for that we are going to have to ask a very personal question to Feet1st? :P
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Message 28862 - Posted: 3 Oct 2006, 14:42:29 UTC - in response to Message 28860.  

Sekerob [caution: "cheeky" comments ahead]
On-Topic.....Baker/Kim have said the subject is closed and right they are.


This is a senseless, and unsubstantiated claim. Either post direct references or don't post at all! What is the point of asserting such a thing and not backing it up with hard facts? And what do you care? Your RAC is low anyway.

[I just wanted to practice the new style of "board-speak". I hope you find it amuseing]


Worst he probably is one of those mayonnaise rockers that use ( Oh the inhumanity of this all) Mayonnaise ( bleech) on his fries instead of malt vinegar.

This and no other is the root from which a Tyrant springs; when he first appears he is a protector.”
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Message 28863 - Posted: 3 Oct 2006, 14:44:20 UTC

Where is a Mod when one needs one?

Ah but my friend there is Feet1st....
This and no other is the root from which a Tyrant springs; when he first appears he is a protector.”
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Message 28879 - Posted: 4 Oct 2006, 2:28:39 UTC - in response to Message 28858.  


On-Topic.....Baker/Kim have said the subject is closed and right they are.


What's that got to do with stinky feet ?


you put catsup on them to hide the smell, of course. ;)

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Message 28880 - Posted: 4 Oct 2006, 2:30:20 UTC - in response to Message 28863.  
Last modified: 4 Oct 2006, 2:34:45 UTC

Where is a Mod when one needs one?


;)
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Message 28881 - Posted: 4 Oct 2006, 2:33:21 UTC - in response to Message 28862.  
Last modified: 4 Oct 2006, 2:36:38 UTC

Worst he probably is one of those mayonnaise rockers that use ( Oh the inhumanity of this all) Mayonnaise ( bleech) on his fries instead of malt vinegar.


sadly that happens this side of the pond as well

m8
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Message 28883 - Posted: 4 Oct 2006, 2:40:31 UTC - in response to Message 28881.  
Last modified: 4 Oct 2006, 2:42:19 UTC

Worst he probably is one of those mayonnaise rockers that use ( Oh the inhumanity of this all) Mayonnaise ( bleech) on his fries instead of malt vinegar.


sadly that happens this side of the pond as well

m8

I saw that minor edit. LOL

I thought Fries were Chips?
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Message 28888 - Posted: 4 Oct 2006, 7:48:11 UTC - in response to Message 28883.  

Worst he probably is one of those mayonnaise rockers that use ( Oh the inhumanity of this all) Mayonnaise ( bleech) on his fries instead of malt vinegar.


sadly that happens this side of the pond as well

m8

I saw that minor edit. LOL

I thought Fries were Chips?


All actually derive from French fries I think..

But in the UK;
Fries are French Fries (thin and straight)
Chips are Chipped Potatoes (often use generally, though normally classed as everything thicker than Fries, anything healthier than what you can buy at McDonalds ;-) i.e. you can taste the potatoe)





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Message 28890 - Posted: 4 Oct 2006, 8:40:43 UTC

Yes here in the UK we have "Fish and chip" shops as opposed to fish and fries shops but this does not mean a nice piece of Cod fillet and a packet of Salt and Vinegar.

This type of meal in Essex is somewhat obligatorarily washed down with a diet coke to ease your conscience about all the fats and calories, that`s if young. The older person sticking to the more traditional " nice cuppa tea" !
Not all Czech`s bounce but I`d like to try with Barbar ;-)

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Message 28892 - Posted: 4 Oct 2006, 8:46:07 UTC - in response to Message 28883.  
Last modified: 4 Oct 2006, 8:47:28 UTC

Worst he probably is one of those mayonnaise rockers that use ( Oh the inhumanity of this all) Mayonnaise ( bleech) on his fries instead of malt vinegar.


sadly that happens this side of the pond as well

m8

I saw that minor edit. LOL

Yes I noticed something too
I thought Fries were Chips?


This is important for the sea monster joke to work.

(the Brits are groaning already and paging down fast - we all heard it at school)

What do sea monsters eat?

Fish and Ships.

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Message 28894 - Posted: 4 Oct 2006, 9:44:01 UTC - in response to Message 28888.  


All actually derive from French fries I think.

A certain wee archaeologist person used to tell me off for saying that ( Evy :-) )
She says they are Belgian.

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Message 28897 - Posted: 4 Oct 2006, 11:27:18 UTC - in response to Message 28894.  
Last modified: 4 Oct 2006, 11:31:32 UTC


All actually derive from French fries I think.

A certain wee archaeologist person used to tell me off for saying that ( Evy :-) )
She says they are Belgian.


YADONCS

Yet another discussion of national chip shops
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Message 28903 - Posted: 4 Oct 2006, 15:01:55 UTC

https://boinc.bakerlab.org/rosetta/forum_thread.php?id=2237
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Message 28922 - Posted: 4 Oct 2006, 19:22:40 UTC - in response to Message 28894.  


All actually derive from French fries I think.

A certain wee archaeologist person used to tell me off for saying that ( Evy :-) )
She says they are Belgian.



I remember something about Belgium claiming to have invented to French Fry (or frie ?). Something about horse fat as well...

Though the chip is certianly british (something about it being invented in yorkshire in the 1700's.)

This is proof the Physicists do talk about some interesting things in the pub :-D



.... I'm off to see if the Wiki has something about chips/fries/smelly feet, it has almost everything else.
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Message 28923 - Posted: 4 Oct 2006, 19:23:42 UTC - in response to Message 28922.  


All actually derive from French fries I think.

A certain wee archaeologist person used to tell me off for saying that ( Evy :-) )
She says they are Belgian.



I remember something about Belgium claiming to have invented to French Fry (or frie ?). Something about horse fat as well...

Though the chip is certianly british (something about it being invented in yorkshire in the 1700's.)

This is proof the Physicists do talk about some interesting things in the pub :-D



.... I'm off to see if the Wiki has something about chips/fries/smelly feet, it has almost everything else.




lol, well would you believe it http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smelly_feet

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Message 28968 - Posted: 6 Oct 2006, 11:05:23 UTC - in response to Message 28923.  

From the Nobel prize front: Stinky feet, annoying noise top IgNobel prize list
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